Philip K. Dick

Ridley Scott's Prophets of Science Fiction, "Philip K. Dick," Episode 2 (2012)

Kevin Long's picture

The Science Channel (Which contains no science) was running a show called "Ridley Scott's Prophets of Science Fiction." I found it on Netflix streaming, and watched the episode on Jules Verne as I figured it was likely to be just entertaining enough to keep my mind from drifting, and just boring enough to put me to sleep. I was exactly right about that. I noted that Episode 2 was about Philip K. Dick. I watched it out of morbid curiosity.

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One Singularity Sensation: Humanoid Robots

Republibot 4.0's picture

Creating robots that are as close to being human as possible is the current holy grail of robotics engineers.

Fantasies of sexbots aside, I'm not exactly sure why androids are so hot--I mean, most of the prototypes I've seen not only cross into the Uncanny Valley, but clear land and build a development.

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BOOK REVIEW: “The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume 2: We Can Remember It For You Wholesale” (1987)

Republibot 3.0's picture

Originally published under the somewhat more reasonable title “Second Variety” in 1987 (Because it was the second in the series), the book was re-titled and re-released in 1990 to cash in on expected the “Total Recall” bonanza. Lest there be any confusion on this point, the full title appears to be “The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume 2: We Can Remember It For You Wholesale, The Story That Inspired The Hit Motion Picture TOTAL RECALL.” That’s the thing about trade paperbacks from the first half of the 90s: You’re never sure where the title ends and the subscript begins.

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Walt Disney was the Tibetan Tulpa

Republibot 3.0's picture

When I saw Phil Dick for the last time, he was beside himself with glee, having recently received a fat check from his agent for film options on a long shopping list of novels and short stories, in every case for a figure in excess of what he had gotten for their original publications. In addition, the first in the series of optioned stories, Blade Runner, was nearing completion and Phil had seen the rushes and heartily approved of how it had turned out.

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BOOK REVIEW: “The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume 1: The Short Happy Life Of The Brown Oxford” (1987)

Republibot 3.0's picture

Ah, Philip K. Dick, is there any dead SF author I loveth more than thee? I think not. Let’s just get the gonzo stuff out of the way up front: I first *heard* of the guy when reading “Space Worlds, Wars, and Weapons,” an odd little cover art coffee table book from the late 1970s, which had a paragraph about Phil’s story “Imposter.” I knew Blade Runner, of course, and I knew nebulously of Phil thereby, but couldn’t remember his name. I do not remember the first story I read by him - odd how true love comes from sometimes murky beginnings, huh?

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INTERVIEW: Tessa Dick talks to us about her latest book and her upcoming novels.

Republibot 3.0's picture

Hello. Welcome to Republibot. I'm your unfortunately-named host, Republibot 3.0, and our guest today is Tessa Dick. This is actually the third time we've interviewed Tessa over the past few years. So what are you up to these days? You've got a new book out, obviously. Tell us about it!

TESSA DICK:

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BEELINE TO THE FUTURE: The Replicant of Philip K. Dick and Other Links

Robert Bee's picture

We are starting to enter the age of the replicant. Singularity Hub, which is a great website for science fictional topics, posted a link to a very interesting replicant video. Three people with android versions of themselves got together for a press conference. Click through and play the video of the remarkably life-like robots. The robots are humanoid and eerie; in fact, the Japanese robot looks more realistic than its human original.

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THINGS WE'RE NOT SURE IF WE'RE LOOKING FORWARD TO OR DREADING: "Radio Free Albemuth" (2011)

Republibot 3.0's picture

Philip K. Dick is my favorite SF author, and "Radio Free Albemuth" is on my very short list of my favorite novels by the guy. It was originally written and submitted to his usual publisher in the mid-1970s. The Publisher seems pleased enough with it, but Dick seems to have not been entirely satisfied, because when they suggested a few changes to him, he completely re-wrote the entire novel from scratch.

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