Book Reviews

BOOK REVIEW: "Stress Pattern" by Neal Barrett Jr. (1974)

Robert Bee's picture

Neal Barrett Jr. is one of those writers that I’ve been meaning to get around to reading for some time; several of his novels have been stacked in the teetering piles of paperbacks that constitute the décor of my home office. Recently, I picked Stress Pattern largely at random out of a bag of paperbacks I recently bought and read through it. The book is a short, 70s SF novel published by DAW books with the old uniform yellowish covers.

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BOOK REVIEW: "The Lively Lives of Chrispin Mobey" By Gabriel Quyth (AKA Gary Jennings) 1988

Republibot 3.0's picture

Consider this a cautionary review of a book most of you would never have heard of in the first place, much less found. I debated even posting it on here as it's pretty much entirely offensive to our people, I'm not sure anything good can come of even reviewing the thing. I'm posting it here, but if anyone thinks even reviewing it is doing more harm than good, and I should take it down, I will

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BOOK REVIEW: “Soon I Will be Invincible” by Austin Grossman (2007)

Republibot 3.0's picture

As Republispouse, my wife, is fond of pointing out, I’m always thinking. It’s the way I make my horribly obvious OCD and other mental woes work for me. It’s not enough that I don’t like a particular kind of cheese, or that golf doesn’t appeal to me, no, that’d be too simple. I have to know *exactly* why I don’t like cheese, and why for some reason this particular kind doesn’t appeal to me when, in fact, several other similarly-related kinds do. I need to know exactly what it is about golf that makes me think about suicide as a viable alternative to playing it.

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BOOK REVIEW: "Roadside Picnic" by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky (1972)

Robert Bee's picture

In Roadside Picnic, a classic novel of Russian science fiction, aliens have landed on several locations on Earth, remained briefly, and then just as mysteriously disappeared. They’ve left behind artifacts in landing areas known as Zones, dangerous places where people encounter bizarre obstacles that can kill without warning, sometimes swiftly and sometimes slowly, such as burning fluff, death lamps, and spitting devil’s cabbage. Many people who enter the Zone, even those with special suits who work for the army and scientific organizations, die gruesome deaths.

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BOOK REVIEW: “Back to the Moon” by Travis S. Taylor and Less Johnson (2010)

Republibot 3.0's picture

I was in the mood for a potboiler the other day. Nothing fancy, mind you, nothing artsy or far-reaching, just a fun little read. The cover of this book fairly screamed out that it was exactly what I was looking for. Or so I thought, but I’ve been wrong before, and I’ll be wrong again…

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BOOK REVIEW: “Homemade Hollywood - Fans Behind The Camera” by Clive Young (2008)

Republibot 3.0's picture

“To Me, the great hope is that now these little 8mm video recorders and stuff have come out, some people who normally wouldn’t make movies are going to be making them, and, you know, suddenly one day, some little fat girl in Ohio is going to be the new Mozart and make a beautiful film with her father’s camcorder. And, for once, the so-called professionalism about movies will be destroyed - forever - and it will really become an art form.” ---Francis Ford Coppola

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BOOK REVIEW: "Hull Zero Three" by Greg Bear (2010)

Robert Bee's picture

Hull Zero Three revolves around the reworking of an old SF trope, the generation starship, a theme used most famously by Heinlein in his 1941 story “Universe.” The penultimate achievement of human engineering, Ship is a colossal vessel with three twelve-kilometer hulls attached to a moon-sized piece of rock and ice that it processes into fuel and materials. Creating gravity through centrifugal spin, Ship is traveling 500 light years for more than thirty centuries at 20% the speed of light.

There will be spoilers in this review.

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BOOK REVIEW: "Outermost: The Art and Life of Jack Gaughan" by Luis Ortiz

Robert Bee's picture

Outermost is a well-illustrated biography of Jack Gaughan, one of the most important SF artists of the 60s. The generous and beautifully reproduced selection of art – some in black and white but the majority in color -- is accompanied by a modest amount of biographical text. Overall, I enjoyed the pictures and the biographical information, but would have preferred more analysis and criticism of Gaughan’s art.

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